K9 Unit

The NC K9 Emergency Response Team, K-9 Teams have been in existence for over 15 years. Teams are available 24 hours a day to respond to request from local, state and federal law enforcement agencies as well as other official public safety agencies.

WHEN CAN SEARCH DOGS BE HELPFUL?

▪ An overdue hiker in a wilderness area
▪ An Alzheimer’s patient who has walked away
▪ A missing child
▪ A drowning victim in a lake
▪ An area where there may be human remains buried
▪ A missing person where suicide is suspected
▪ To locate human remains after a fire

WHAT SEARCH DOG TEAMS ARE ABLE TO DO

Trailing dogs are trained to follow the path that a missing person has taken. Similar to traditional “tracking” dogs, these dogs require a properly preserved scent article and should not be distracted by other people in the area. These dogs usually work on long leashes. Trailing dogs frequently work trails that are 24 to 36 hours old.

Area search dogs are trained to find any human scent in an area. These dogs work most frequently off-leash and can cover large areas. Search dogs can be helpful in a variety of situations in the wilderness, as well as, in urban settings. Many of our mission-ready dog teams are also certified for:

1. Water
2. Cadaver

It is estimated that a single dog team can be as effective as 20 to 30 trained human searchers in locating a missing person in a given time frame. Please remember a search dog is a tool and like any tool, there are limitations. Some of the factors that impact a search dog’s ability to detect scent include air temperature, humidity, terrain, wind and age of scent.

HANDLER TRAINING

Dog handlers are continually updating their skills and knowledge and most participate in 50 to 100 hours or more of training and missions per month. Dog handlers must have all of the training required of other search team members such as first aid, navigation, survival and man-tracking, plus special skills required to be a dog handlers.

DOG TRAINING

Search dogs are well-socialized animals and represent a wide variety of breeds from retrievers, border collies to bloodhounds and German shepherds. They are tested extensively for temperament and must be able to work independently and for long durations. Search dogs are exposed to a wide variety of conditions and are expected to function in almost any environment they are placed in. Minimum dog training requirements include socialization, obedience, helicopter orientation, and search work. As a team, the dog and handler must pass a series of search tests to become operational. On average, it takes 18 months to 2 years for a handler and dog to become operational. Teams must participate in on-going training throughout the year, as well as, re-certification by a nationally recognized organization.

K9 UNIT

The NC K9 Emergency Response Team, K-9 Teams have been in existence for over 15 years. Teams are available 24 hours a day to respond to request from local, state and federal law enforcement agencies as well as other official public safety agencies.

WHEN CAN SEARCH DOGS BE HELPFUL?

  • An overdue hiker in a wilderness area
  • An Alzheimer’s patient who has walked away
  • A missing child
  • A drowning victim in a lake
  • An area where there may be human remains buried
  • A missing person where suicide is suspected
  • To locate human remains after a fire

 

WHAT SEARCH DOG TEAMS ARE ABLE TO DO

Trailing dogs are trained to follow the path that a missing person has taken. Similar to traditional “tracking” dogs, these dogs require a properly preserved scent article and should not be distracted by other people in the area. These dogs usually work on long leashes. Trailing dogs frequently work trails that are 24 to 36 hours old.

 Area search dogs are trained to find any human scent in an area. These dogs work most frequently off-leash and can cover large areas. Search dogs can be helpful in a variety of situations in the wilderness, as well as, in urban settings. Many of our mission-ready dog teams are also certified for:

  1. Water
  2. Cadaver

It is estimated that a single dog team can be as effective as 20 to 30 trained human searchers in locating a missing person in a given time frame. Please remember a search dog is a tool and like any tool, there are limitations. Some of the factors that impact a search dog’s ability to detect scent include air temperature, humidity, terrain, wind and age of scent.

HANDLER TRAINING

Dog handlers are continually updating their skills and knowledge and most participate in 50 to 100 hours or more of training and missions per month. Dog handlers must have all of the training required of other search team members such as first aid, navigation, survival and man-tracking, plus special skills required to be a dog handlers.

DOG TRAINING

Search dogs are well-socialized animals and represent a wide variety of breeds from retrievers, border collies to bloodhounds and German shepherds. They are tested extensively for temperament and must be able to work independently and for long durations. Search dogs are exposed to a wide variety of conditions and are expected to function in almost any environment they are placed in. Minimum dog training requirements include socialization, obedience, helicopter orientation, and search work. As a team, the dog and handler must pass a series of search tests to become operational. On average, it takes 18 months to 2 years for a handler and dog to become operational. Teams must participate in on-going training throughout the year, as well as, re-certification by a nationally recognized organization.

HOW TO REQUEST NC K9 E.R.T. SEARCH DOG TEAM

If you think a search dog may be helpful to you, please contact

NC K9 E.R.T. at: 919-796-2218. You may also contact the Search Coordinators at 919-815-3040 or 252-245-4977. The Search Coordinator can discuss your situation with you and make recommendations regarding the use of search dogs or other search resources.